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Every SEO-Optimized Page Needs These 10 Elements

Search engine optimization can be a big juggling act. There are many things you need to keep in mind. Drop just one ball and your rankings could tumble – Or never appear in the first place.

These are ten of the most important elements to a well optimized page. Get these ten things right and your chances of ranking well are exponentially higher.

Title Tag

Your title tag is the most important tag on your entire website. Google uses it to determine your primary keywords. It’s also the “headline” in your listing in Google, which users use to determine whether or not to click.

Have an attention catching title tag that also contains your main keyword. Make sure you optimize the title tag so that it is different on each page.

Header Tags

Your H1 and H2 tags carry more weight in Google’s eyes than any other text on the page. Make sure your keyword is in your H1 tags and that related keywords or LSI words are sprinkled throughout the H2 tags on your site.

The Page URL

Your page’s URL should have your main keywords in it. It should also be short and should tell people something about the page. For example, “/posted=39048” is not a good URL. On the other hand, “how-to-build-quality-backlinks” is.

Description Tag

Your description tag contains the text that appears below the title tag in your search engine listing. Again, people use this information to decide whether or not to click on your site. This tag won’t actually improve your rankings, but can help improve the number of people who click on your site once they see your listing in the search engines.

Facebook and Twitter

Social media metrics are playing an increasingly large role in SEO. Google takes many factors into consideration. They consider how many fans you have on your page. They consider who shares your content, as well as the authority of the people sharing your content. A share from Bill Gates is weighed much more heavily than the average person.

They can also “read” the content of social media posts about you. If people are complaining about your product rather than praising it, search engines can read that to a certain degree.

If you don’t already have Facebook and Twitter setup, now is the time to do it. It’s not just for social media traffic, it’s also for SEO.

Highly Targeted Web Content 

The quality of your website’s content is becoming a larger and larger factor. While Google bots still can’t “read” a website and independently determine the page’s quality as a human could, they do come close.

The Google Panda update utilizes artificial intelligence as well as hundreds of different metrics, including ads to content ratio, overall design, many linguistic patterns and so on to determine the quality level of your site and content.

Nobody knows what all these metrics are. Instead of trying to game the system, it’s best to focus on providing high quality content that people want to link to.

Multi-Media

Google loves multi-media. If you’re not using images, videos and audio in your website, you’re probably missing out on a large amount of ranking power.

User Generated Content

Having a lot of content generated by your users is one easy way to take the pressure to create content off your shoulders, while giving Google all the more reason to place you higher in the search engines.

If you have a blog, try to cultivate active discussion. If you have a normal website, try to make one section of your site a wiki. If you have a high traffic website, try creating a forum. Try to create as much crawlable user generated content as possible.

Embedded RSS Feeds & News Content

Google loves to see websites that are updated regularly. One easy way to add a constant cycle to your website is to embed an RSS feed.

Keep in mind that this RSS feed should consist of only a small portion of your website. Google doesn’t like sites that use “automated content,” meaning using only feeds to fill a site. Instead, Google likes high quality content sites that supplement their content with feeds from other people’s content.

Diverse Internal Linking Structure

Try to have an internal linking structure that makes it easy for users to navigate from relevant page to relevant page. By linking to relevant pieces of content, you also make it easier for Google to do its job.

There are two main schools of thought in internal linking: Silo structure or flat structure.

A silo structure means separating your site into different keyword categories and interlinking sites only within those categories. This keeps the link juice separated, almost like mini-sites in your website.

The flat structure setup means linking to relevant content across your entire website.

There isn’t a set consensus on which method is better. The key is simply to make sure that you are linking to other relevant pieces of content across your website.

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March 15th, 2012 by admin

The Secret to Blogging Success: Marry Content with Promotion

 

Just writing your blog posts is not enough. It’s a common saying among journalists and bloggers alike that Content is King.” While this is true, just having great content isn’t enough. You also need great marketing to get that content in front of customers.

 

 

At a certain point, the quality of your content matters more than your marketing. However, in order to get to that point, you need to first have a very solid reader base. A solid enough reader base that a truly spectacular piece of content can go viral.

In order to do that, you need thousands of readers. To get that kind of following, you need to promote your blog posts.

Here’s how to do it.

 

Promote Each of Your Posts Individually

One big mistake marketers often make is promoting just the home page of a blog, rather than promoting their sub-pages. What they fail to realize is that Google ranks web pages rather than web sites.

If you want your pages to rank in Google, you need to work on getting each and every one of those pages to rank, rather than your website as a whole.

 

Develop a Per-Post Marketing Strategy 

Try to come up with a marketing strategy that you can execute every time you make a new post.

For example, let’s say you have a posting schedule of 2 posts a week, once on Monday and once on Thursday.

In addition to writing and posting the content, add promoting the content to your schedule. You should have an exact sequence of promotion tactics you follow through on each and every time you post a new piece of content.

 

Ways of Promoting Blog Posts

Once you’ve written a piece of high quality content, how can you promote it? There are several ways.

One of the easiest ways is to use article marketing. Article marketing involves posting articles on other sites like Squidoo, HubPages or EzineArticles and having a link in the article pointing back to your site. If you publish a few articles with backlinks to your content every time you publish a blog post, you’ll soon have hundreds of links coming into your site.

Another way of promoting your blog posts is to use fairly established systems of back linking, such as directory submissions or social media profile links. You can often get some pretty decent PR links back to your site using these methods.

You can also pay to get backlinks to your site. This is viewed with a little bit of apprehension by some bloggers as Google frowns upon the practice; but it can also be a very fast and easy way to get backlinks.

You can use social media and social bookmarking to get backlinks. Posting your new content on StumbleUpon, Reddit or Digg can be a great way to get new audience participation. If you have a small following already, you can just post the new content to your Facebook and/or Twitter to get people to link to you.

You can write a guest post that links to your new article. Contact other bloggers and see if they’d be interested in having you write a piece of content in exchange for a link.

Also, you might want to consider commenting on other blogs where they have posted similar content to your topic. Such comments on popular blogs can lead to a substantial amount of traffic, if done well.

These are all different ways you can promote your blog post. The most important thing isn’t necessarily how your promote your content, but that you have a solid and consistent plan to do it.

It’s true that it’s important to have high quality content. However, in addition to quality content, you need a quality marketing plan. Create the plan first, then you can focus on writing top notch content.

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February 6th, 2012 by admin

Why Mobile SEO is Overhyped

Mobile SEO is a common misnomer in both the search and mobile industries. It simply doesn’t exist.

Why? When most people say “Mobile SEO,” what they really mean is local SEO. They’re talking about optimizing your website for users on their mobile phones doing searches on the go. For example, if you own a pizza shop and someone types in “Pizza” when they’re in your city, you want your result to show up first.

 

Is Local SEO the Same as Mobile SEO?

Yes. 

Mobile SEO is often presented as a new and emerging concern for website owners. In reality, it’s not new at all: It’s simply local SEO presented in a different fashion.

Learning to rank in local SEO means understanding the ways your users find businesses in your area, then optimizing for them.

Two of the most common ways are Google searches and Yelp searches.

Google searches depend on a lot of different factors, many of which are different than normal SEO factors. While being ranked well in the search engines for standard search will help, there’s extra work that needs to be done for local search.

You need to pay attention to citations. Citations are the number and accuracy of other sites that “cite” your business. These include the Yellow Pages, SuperPages, CitySearch and other such directories. Google uses them to validate your business to ensure that you really are who you say you are. Make sure the information from all the directories match your Google Places information.

You also need to pay attention to your ratings. The more ratings you have and the higher users rate your establishment the better your chances of ranking.

Optimizing for Yelp is mostly about getting as many reviews as possible, preferably with a high ranking. Getting a good ranking is crucial, but it’s better to have 200 reviews with a 4 star rating than 2 reviews with a 5 star rating. Focus on quantity first, but make sure you have the product and experience necessary that those ratings will be high.

 

Why Creating a “Made for Mobile” Site is a Bad Idea

Creating a “made for mobile” website is a bad idea for several reasons. First of all, it lets you be lazy on your main site design. It can also wreck havoc on your SEO efforts if it’s not done properly.
 

 

A great website should have great design. Great design will look great, no matter if you’re looking at it from an iPhone, an Android tablet or a desktop computer. Designing a second website just for mobile websites essentially means your main site just wasn’t designed carefully enough.

Many of the world’s best designed and most well known websites don’t have a different web version versus phone versions. For example, Apple’s website looks exactly the same on an iPhone as it does on a PC.

Having several different versions of your website can also cause search engines to get confused. It can get you penalized for duplicate content.

There are several ways around the issue. First, you can use rel=canonical to help redirect search engines from the mobile version of your site to your main site, if you absolutely have to have a secondary URL.

If you can avoid using a secondary URL, try to use flexible CSS and fluid layouts to help make the website look the same no matter what browser someone’s using. You can also use PHP’s user-agent detection to serve slightly different versions of websites to mobile users versus PC users.

No matter what you do, make sure there’s always a link to the full version of your website on any version of your mobile website.

There you have it. If you optimize your standard website to be top notch on both PC and mobile, you simply won’t have to do any extra work on creating an extra site. If you optimize your website for local results as well as global results, you’ll reap the benefits in both local searches and in the web in general, without having to put work specifically into “mobile SEO.”

 

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January 31st, 2012 by admin

13 World Events That Rocked the Social Media World in 2011

Social media is most often used to keep friends connected with friends. However, every once in a while, something happens that ignites the social sphere with discussion, news, controversy and caring.

These are some of the most powerful, impactful, viral and moving social media events of 2011.

Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

 

japan-earthquake-and-tsunami

 

Japan’s earthquake and tsunami touched the world. The resulting chaos at Fukushima and the nuclear radiation brought increased concern about nuclear power globally. The world pooled together its resources to help Japan recover.

An hour after the quake hit Japan, there were reports that Twitter was experiencing 1,200 tweets posted every minute. And at most times today, eight or nine of Twitter's top 10 Trending Tropics — such as #prayforjapan, #tsunami and #japan — were directly related to the earthquake and tsunami.

On Facebook, people not only posted thoughts and prayers for the people of Japan, but also used their updates to tell friends and family where they are and how they are doing. Facebook pages related to the disaster, such as Japan Earthquake, also popped up, grabbing nearly 3,000 followers in about 12 hours.

 

Death of Steve Jobs

 

Steve Jobs Death

 

Steve Jobs was one of the most iconic and influential people of the Silicon Valley. He revolutionized three different industries: The PC industry, the music industry and the animation industry.

Steve Jobs, along with Steve Wozniak, created the first personal computer to have an integrated keyboard. They were the first to create a completely workable all-in-one computer. He created the iPod, the first mobile device capable of holding over 1,000 songs. He created iTunes, the most popular music store on the planet. He also helped found Pixar, which created the first computer generated full picture movie in history.

Internet users likely broke records as they jammed Twitter with tweets marked #iSad and #ThankYouSteve and flooded Facebook's news streams, swiftly spreading the news of Steve Jobs's death. Twitter activity hit 10,000 tweets per second following the announcement about Apple's co-founder death.

 

UK Riots

 

UK Riots

 

The riots in the UK were blamed in large part to social media. Riots were organized and incited through text messages, social media sites and other forms of Web 2.0 communication.

During the riots, questions of how much control governments should or shouldn't have over mobile communications became a central concern.

Here's a video that reveals how English rioters used Social Media.

 

Death of Muammar Gaddafi

 

 

Muammar Gaddafi, died on 20th October, 2011 during the Libyan Civil War 2011. He was fired at by the NTC and captured alive but wounded after taking refuge in a large drainage pipe with his loyal bodyguards. In a video published soon after, he can be seen draped with a cloth and his body being paraded and kicked by anti-Gaddafi protestors.

On Twitter, many users expressed joy at Gadaffi’s death, including tweets in Arabic saying things like “God is great” and “Libya is now 100% DEGAFFINATED”.

 

Social Media IPO’s

 

Facebook IPO

 

Pandora IPOed at $2.56 billion, LinkedIn IPOed at $4.2 billion and Facebook’s IPO is estimated to be at over $50 billion, creating over 1,000 millionaires overnight.

Social media has taken over the web sphere and social media sites, which hardly had any attention at all just five years ago, are poised to take center stage of both the internet and the business worlds.

 

Hurricane Irene

 

Hurricane Irene

 

Hurricane Irene had windspeeds so dangerous that President Obama declared an evacuation of New York City. In addition to whipping up the seas and the winds, Hurricane Irene also whipped up the twittersphere.

Tweeters were using social media to keep one another up to date on danger zones, safety tips, family information and more. It put social media to a humanitarian use. More than a million Twitter messages were posted about Irene.

A Facebook page was created to help strangers try to return found items to their owners. As of today, more than 98,600 people had "liked" the page and many had already posted images of items they've found.

Read the rest of this entry »

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January 6th, 2012 by admin

Hiring a Link Builder? Here’s How to Train Them

Teaching someone to build links can be quite challenging. Not only do they need to learn a lot of technical skills, but they also have to have the tenacity to follow through with potential leads. They need to also be able to convince people to build the actual link.

If you’ve been working in the internet industry for some time, it can be easy to underestimate how much specialized knowledge you actually have. Before teaching someone how to build links, you’ll often have to go over a lot of things that you consider basic.

All that said, here’s how to take a brand new link builder and turn them into a pro.

Basic Training

The first step to teaching someone link building is to teach them the fundamentals.

What is a high quality link? What is PageRank? What is anchor text? What is the difference between an in-body link and a footer link, the difference between a no follow link and a do follow link?

The best way to teach them the basics of link building is to expose them to concepts gradually. Don’t just dump a 200 page eBook on them or send them to read 50 articles. Instead, teach them one concept a day or have them read one article a day while they’re learning the rest of what they need to know.

Software and Procedure

Next teach them about all the software they’ll need to know how to use, the basic procedure and linkbuilding techniques that you plan on employing.

Have them watch you do it several times before asking them to do it for themselves. A few of the most important things to cover include:

  • Data gathering tools. Tools to check PageRank, tools to check traffic, tools to check nofollow status of backlinks and so forth. Make sure they know how to use the tools and have the tools installed on their own computers.
  • Status of current projects. What kind of links are you targeting right now? What are the bottlenecks and what are the next steps? What was the mentality or philosophy that went into cultivating these links?
  • Linkbuilding tools. Make sure they know how to use any tools necessary in the actual link building process. The exact tools depend on your methodology, but can include social media submitters, backlink checkers, content spinners, etc.
  • How to find and make contact with websites. Walk them through the process and make sure they understand what it’s like before trying it themselves.

Teaching Them the Sales Sequence

The first 30 days on the job will usually give you enough information about the candidate that you’ll be able to tell whether or not they’ll succeed in the long run.

Though technical skills can be taught to a lot of people, the most important skill when it comes to linkbuilding is sales. The ultimate question is: Can this trainee convince other people to link to your website?

Within about 30 days, you should be able to find out.

Teaching your candidate the sales sequence depends should be part theory part practice. In the beginning, you’ll want to hold their hand through the process. Once they know what the process looks like, you’ve got to let them go to see whether they sink or swim.

The most important aspects to cover in the sales sequence include: 1) Finding potential sites to get links from, 2) Researching those sites, 3) Making the initial contact and 4) Closing the deal.

 

 

Throughout the whole process your trainee needs to be keeping great notes. If they hit a block in the road, it might make sense to have another team member take over the correspondence. If that happens, they need to know exactly how to pick up where the first person left off.

 

Do several links together in the beginning to make sure they understand everything from front to back. Then give them a few assignments and have them report back. Finally, once they’re up and running, create a set of metrics that you want to track and let them do their job, using you as a resource if they have any questions.

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December 26th, 2011 by admin

eBook 101: The Writing, Launching and Selling Process

Getting an information eBook off the ground is one of the best ways to start earning online revenue. The process of writing, launching and making money with an eBook involves a lot more than most people realize.

Launching an eBook is much like launching any other product. You first need to do extensive market research to make sure you’re creating a product that people want to buy. Then you need to spend a lot of time creating a good product, so that people who buy it will buy again in the future. Finally, you need to market the product well so that your target audience knows about its existence.

Here’s how to write, launch and sell your informational eBook.

Before You Write a Single Word

Before you write a single word, you need to do your market research.

Doing your market research involves figuring out exactly who your target audience is. Once you know your audience, you then need to figure out what they want.

Your audience should be a very specific group of people. For example, if you’re selling a weight loss product, “women” is far, far too generic. Instead, you might want to go for something like women in their 30’s who are about 40 pounds overweight. You might even want to go more specific than that: Housewives in their 30’s, 40 pounds overweight.

This gives you a very specific market to cater to. It allows you to market to your highest ROI market segment.

Once you know who you’re talking to, the next step is to figure out what they want. There are a few ways to do this.

You can do your research online. Find message boards, chat rooms and website dedicated to your market segment. Look for repeat questions and pain points that seem to come up often.

Also read magazines that cater to your market. What kind of hot buttons do they continually push?

Once you’ve figured out what your market really wants, you can then write an eBook around that topic and know you have a fairly good chance of hitting it out of the park.

Writing the eBook

Creating an eBook is quite a mission. An eBook is typically at least 20,000 words, often a lot more. That means a lot of time in front of the computer.

At times you may question whether or not you’re really committed. At times you might wonder if the eBook will sell, and whether you’re just putting all this effort into something that might just go down the drain.

Staying motivated is a big part of success when it comes to writing an eBook.

Perhaps the best way to write an eBook is to set a daily goal. Instead of trying to write it all at once, just set a goal for yourself. That goal might be 500 words a day, it might be 1,000 words a day. It might be one page a day or three pages a day. Whatever the case may be, just set a daily goal and try to stick to that goal.

At 3 pages a day, in 30 days you’ll have a 90 page eBook. It might not seem like much progress at first, but it very quickly snowballs.

Launching & Selling Your eBook

If you already have an audience, start by launching your book there. Announce your new eBook to your blog, your email list, your Facebook friends and your Twitter followers.

If you don’t already have an email list, the going gets a little bit harder. First, start by seeing if you can find other people who have an audience to promote your book. If you’ve been in the industry for a while, chances are you know some other people who might have some influence.

You can also try paid marketing. Using tools like Google AdWords, Microsoft AdCenter or Facebook Ads can be a powerful way to make an impact.

Finally, try SEO. Create an informative website about your subject and create top notch content about that topic. This method takes more time, but can generate consistent traffic.

Getting an eBook off the ground takes dedication. Once it’s off the ground however, it can generate a lot of revenue for years to come.

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December 16th, 2011 by admin

How to Guest Post to Promote Your Blog

One of the oldest yet most successful ways to promote a blog is through guest posting. Guest Post to promote your blog

Guest posting allows you to get in front of an existing blog’s audience. Unlike just a standard backlink you actually get an entire page to demonstrate that you know your topic.

How do you guest post on someone else’s blog? Let’s take a look.

Finding and Selecting Blogs to Approach

The first step is to find blogs that you’d like to guest post on and approach them about doing the post.

There are two main ways you can do this. First, through getting to know all the relevant blogs in your sphere. Use, Google, Technorati and blogrolls to find relevant blogs and figure out which ones you’d like to appear on.

Alternatively, you can use MyBlogGuest.com’s forums to find blog owners who are actively looking for guest bloggers.

Once you’ve chosen a blog to approach, how do you pitch the blog post?

Making the Pitch

There are two different trains of thought when it comes to pitching posts: Either email the website owner first with a list of potential topics; or just write an entire guest blog and email it to them.

If you’re emailing them a list of potential topics, make sure you include a brief bio and a link to your blog so they can learn more about you. Make it short, or you risk your email not being read.

Make sure each topic suggestion is compelling and targeted specifically towards their audience.

If you’re sending an entire written article already, just send a brief intro in your email. Your whole email should be no more than two or three short paragraphs long. Let your article speak for itself.

How to Write a Successful Post

There are a few things to keep in mind when it comes to writing posts that other people’s audience will love.

First of all, spend some time on their site and get to know their audience. Know what kinds of topics they like and what writing styles they respond to. Write your guest post so that their audience feels like you’re talking directly to them.

Make sure your blog post answers a burning question in their mind or answers a popular question. If you can take a unique angle to something that’s been discussed in the past, so much the better.

Spend as much time on a guest blog post as you would on a post that goes on your own website.

After The Post Goes Live

A lot of the work in guest posting actually comes after the post has actually been published.

The first thing you want to do is help promote the post. Use Twitter, Facebook and your own email list to promote the post.

Why? Because if the post is successful, you’ll have a very good chance of having another chance to guest blog in the future. Also, if more people see your post, that’s more people who’re going to end up learning about you and seeing your content in action.

Also, having many successful blog posts on different sites will help build your reputation among the blogerati, further increasing your chances of getting more guest blogging gigs in the future.

Another thing you should do after the post is live is check the comments section religiously.

Remember: The people who read and post in the comment section are the site’s most loyal and active readers. If you win these readers over, they’re likely going to turn into active fans of your site as well.

Make sure to respond to every single comment that was posted in response to your article.

 

That’s the long and short of how to succeed in using guest blogging to promote your blog. Guest blogging can be an incredibly powerful way to get in front of audiences of people who may end up loving your content. It’s not the easiest link building method on the planet, but it’s very, very effective.

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December 6th, 2011 by zeeshan

SMO vs. Engagement: Why They’re Different and How You Can Rock Both

When it comes to social media, there are two factors that drive success: Social Media Optimization (SMO) and engagement. Often time’s these two are confused with one another. Though they’re related, they actually address completely different fields within the social media sphere.

So what is SMO, what is engagement and how are they different?

What is Social Media Optimization?

Social media optimization is the more quantitative side of the social media equation. It’s what allows marketers to tackle social media in a systematic and scientific manner.

Let’s say you’re trying to get a certain fan page to go viral. One way you can measure this in SMO terms is through what percentage of people repost your posts.

So if you post something on your wall and it’s “shared” by 1.5% of your fans, that gives you a benchmark metric to measure against. If you track this number whenever you post status updates, you can very quickly start to get a sense for what kinds of things get passed along and what kinds of things don’t.

This is just one example of SMO in action. SMO can track visitors to a page, the number of shares, number of likes, peak traffic times, best days to post and a whole slew of other statistics that you can use to optimize your campaign.

In other words, SMO is the systematic and scientific approach to getting more people to like your page, more shares and overall a more powerful brand effect.

What is Engagement?

Engagement on the other hand is a completely different ballgame. Engagement is the qualitative side of the social media equation.

It’s how engaged your fans are with your work. It’s how emotionally vested they are in your brand. It’s how excited they get about your product when they tell their friends about it. It’s how much they think you care about them.

Fostering engagement doesn’t come from statistics and calculations. Instead, it comes from regularly connecting with your audience in an engaging dialogue.

If you want to foster more engagement, make it a regular goal of yours to foster more activity from your users.

Ask them questions. Get them talking to you and to one another. Host contests that get them involved. Create games for your users. Ask for their feedback.

Pull them into your brand experience. Your users should feel like they’re part of your community.

Two Sides of the Same Coin

It’s important to realize that if you want to succeed on social media, you need to use both optimization and engagement.

If you only have optimization, you’ll have a very technically well run campaign, but it just won’t have that “buzz.” That “buzz” is what causes social media campaigns to take off like wildfire. It’s what gets people to stick around. It’s what people remember.

On the other hand, if you only have engagement, you’re probably not getting as many people to your pages as you could. If you’re not posting your updates at optimal times, if you’re not tracking what kinds of content your visitors like, if you’re not using systematic testing to determine what really works, you’re probably going to have a hard time succeeding in the long run.

In order for you to have a vibrant social media campaign that engages a lot of people, you need to have both optimization and engagement.

Start out in the area where you’re weakest. If you already have an engaged community but haven’t been tracking your metrics, work on your metrics first. On the other hand, if you already have a scientifically well optimized campaign but your user base lacks passion, start out by increasing engagement.

 

That’s the long and short of what SMO is and what engagement is. In the long run, you want to master both to get your campaigns to really take off. Your campaigns must make scientific sense, but they also need to capture the heart of your fans.

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December 1st, 2011 by zeeshan

7 Practical & Easy to Execute Tips on Link Building

For many people, linkbuilding is the most difficult part of SEO. It seems like a mysterious puzzle that’s Link-Buildingincredibly difficult to crack. But once you really get down to it, getting backlinks is just a matter of finding the right strategies for your business.

Here are seven practical & easy to execute methods on getting backlinks today.

 

Tip #1: Do Guest Blogging

Go to MyBlogGuest.com and sign up for an account. Guest Blogging ro Link BuildingThis is the #1 forum for people who want guest posters on their website.

If you’re an expert on a certain topic and want to get more traffic, guest blogging is truly the way to go about it.
Not only do you get high quality, high PageRank backlinks but you also get quality visitors from other websites coming to your site.

Tip #2: Analyze Your Competitor’s Strategy and Copy It

Analyze Your Competitor’s Strategy and Copy ItBetter yet, improve on it and push them out of their position.

Use backlink checking tools to figure out what kind of places your top competitors are getting their backlinks from.

Are they using guest posting? Or are they using article submissions? Perhaps they’re paying for backlinks?

Whatever strategy they’re using, you’ll know it’s working in their industry for sure. Copy it and you’ll see similar results.

 

Tip #3: Contact Journalists on HARO

 

Contact Journalists on HARO for Link Building

HARO or “Help a Reporter Out” is an online newsletter mailed once or twice a day to people who’re interested in getting interviewed.Getting interviewed for a publication is a great way to get exposure and get at least one backlink, provided you can get them to link back to your website.

Often time’s all you need to do is have a phone conversation with the reporter for them to place you in the newspaper, online publication or magazine. You don’t even need to write anything.

Tip #4: Generating Your Own Links

Generating your own links is still a very valid strategy. Although the Panda update has penalized these links somewhat, they can still be a significant part of your overall link profile.

These links include article submission links, links from sites like Squidoo or HubPages and profile backlinks.
Remember not to overdo it on any one link source, or you risk looking like you’re getting spammy links.

Tip #5: Don’t Be Afraid to Pay

Don’t Be Afraid to Pay for Link BuildingDon’t be afraid to pay for either links or manpower for building links.

Buying links outright is considered blackhat and could get you penalized by Google. However, the realistic chances of you being found out are quite slim. That said, it may or may not be worth the risk.

However, paying for someone to post on forums for you or create social media profiles for you is completely within the ballpark.

Learning to outsource effectively is a big part of successfully running an online business. Don’t spend your time on work that could be farmed out for $3 an hour.

Tip #6: The Real Way to Use Blog Commenting
Blog commenting used to be a big source of backlinks. Today it’s not considered a solid source at all. The Real Way to Use Blog Commenting for Link Building

However, it’s important to realize that blog commenting’s real power doesn’t necessarily come from getting one link from the blog comment itself.

Instead, you can often get a lot of people to look at your site by writing intelligent replies. If the people who land on your site like your content, they’ll start commenting on your site as well and potentially link back to you.

In other words, there’s a lot of indirect backlinking power that comes from writing good blog comments.

Tip #7: Don’t Neglect Internal Linking

Don’t Neglect Internal Linking for Link BuildingFinally, don’t neglect the power of your own web pages. Remember that Google doesn’t rank “websites,” they rank “web pages.” You already have a huge and easily accessible source of high quality backlinks: Your own pages.

Each and every page or post on your site should link to 3-5 other related pages on your site. This is easy to do with a “related pages” type of plugin in WordPress.

As you can tell, there is a really wide range of different ways you can build backlinks. Some take longer and can get you higher quality links, while others are much easier but get low quality links. Your best bet is usually a mixture of different link types of with links of differing quality.
 

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November 28th, 2011 by zeeshan

Top 10 Tips for Creating a Good Landing Page

Your landing page is more important than any other page on your website. Why? Because if you don’t sell someone on giving you their email, purchasing your introductory product or learning more about your services, then the rest of your sales funnel will be completely wasted.

A great landing page will instantly grab a reader’s attention and get them interested in what you’re offering.

The following infographic sums up all the points discussed below and mastering these will help you craft an absolutely phenomenal landing page with off-the-roof conversions.

 

Tip #1 – The “Reader Callout” Headline

Your headline needs get your readers to feel like you’re talking to them directly. They should feel pulled towards the screen. They should instantly get the sense that their life can improve if they read your page and learned a bit more about what you’re offering.

Spend as much time as necessary on your headline. Most top copywriters write 50+ headlines and choose the best one, rather than just writing one headline.

Tip #2 – Play Up the Problem

Describe the problem and try to turn up the dial on the pain. If you can get the reader in the emotional state of being angry, frustrated or fed up with their current situation, you have a much better chance of getting them to take action to change it.

Tip #3 – Use the “You Perspective”

Write your copy from the perspective of your user’s benefits, rather than what makes your product or service great. For example, it’s much better to say “By using X, you’ll get A, B, and C benefit, solving your Z issue” than to say “Product X has E, F, G features.”

Tip #4 – Use Proof Elements

Why should someone believe the claims you’re making? Can you actually prove that you can deliver on the promises you made? Proof elements include before and after photos, celebrity endorsements, testimonials, video and audio proof and so on. The more the better.

Tip #5 – Reduce the Action Commitment

Try to make the first action you ask someone to take as easy as possible. For example, it’s much easier to just fill out a name and email than it is to fill out name, email, phone number and address.

You might get 20% of your readers to fill out the former and only 2% to fill out the latter. Make the first commitment as light as possible.

Tip #6 – Remove the Navigation

Don’t have navigation on your landing page. That directs the reader’s eyes to only the copy and the call to action that you want them to take. Pages with no navigation usually have significantly higher conversion rates than pages with navigation.

Tip #7 – Professional Design

Having good design isn’t essential for a landing page, but having unprofessional looking design will kill your landing page. If a page looks like it was built in 1995, your users aren’t going to feel comfortable typing in their credit card or even their email address.

Tip #8 – One Clear Call to Action

Don’t try to get people to take more than one action at a time. Your landing page should have just one thing you want your users to do, no more. Choices tend to reduce conversions.

Tip #9 – Use an Attention Catching Image

A before after image, an image of a celebrity using your product, or even an image of an attractive woman can often increase conversions.

The image must be relevant to your product and it should be attention catching. If it does these two things, it’s worth testing it to see how it affects your response rate.

Tip #10 – Split Test

To build a great landing page, you’ll need to test several different versions to see which converts the best. Often time’s a small change to a landing page can result in huge differences. The only way to really figure out what’s best for your landing page is to test, test, test.

 

 

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November 21st, 2011 by zeeshan