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Hiring a Link Builder? Here’s How to Train Them

Teaching someone to build links can be quite challenging. Not only do they need to learn a lot of technical skills, but they also have to have the tenacity to follow through with potential leads. They need to also be able to convince people to build the actual link.

If you’ve been working in the internet industry for some time, it can be easy to underestimate how much specialized knowledge you actually have. Before teaching someone how to build links, you’ll often have to go over a lot of things that you consider basic.

All that said, here’s how to take a brand new link builder and turn them into a pro.

Basic Training

The first step to teaching someone link building is to teach them the fundamentals.

What is a high quality link? What is PageRank? What is anchor text? What is the difference between an in-body link and a footer link, the difference between a no follow link and a do follow link?

The best way to teach them the basics of link building is to expose them to concepts gradually. Don’t just dump a 200 page eBook on them or send them to read 50 articles. Instead, teach them one concept a day or have them read one article a day while they’re learning the rest of what they need to know.

Software and Procedure

Next teach them about all the software they’ll need to know how to use, the basic procedure and linkbuilding techniques that you plan on employing.

Have them watch you do it several times before asking them to do it for themselves. A few of the most important things to cover include:

  • Data gathering tools. Tools to check PageRank, tools to check traffic, tools to check nofollow status of backlinks and so forth. Make sure they know how to use the tools and have the tools installed on their own computers.
  • Status of current projects. What kind of links are you targeting right now? What are the bottlenecks and what are the next steps? What was the mentality or philosophy that went into cultivating these links?
  • Linkbuilding tools. Make sure they know how to use any tools necessary in the actual link building process. The exact tools depend on your methodology, but can include social media submitters, backlink checkers, content spinners, etc.
  • How to find and make contact with websites. Walk them through the process and make sure they understand what it’s like before trying it themselves.

Teaching Them the Sales Sequence

The first 30 days on the job will usually give you enough information about the candidate that you’ll be able to tell whether or not they’ll succeed in the long run.

Though technical skills can be taught to a lot of people, the most important skill when it comes to linkbuilding is sales. The ultimate question is: Can this trainee convince other people to link to your website?

Within about 30 days, you should be able to find out.

Teaching your candidate the sales sequence depends should be part theory part practice. In the beginning, you’ll want to hold their hand through the process. Once they know what the process looks like, you’ve got to let them go to see whether they sink or swim.

The most important aspects to cover in the sales sequence include: 1) Finding potential sites to get links from, 2) Researching those sites, 3) Making the initial contact and 4) Closing the deal.

 

 

Throughout the whole process your trainee needs to be keeping great notes. If they hit a block in the road, it might make sense to have another team member take over the correspondence. If that happens, they need to know exactly how to pick up where the first person left off.

 

Do several links together in the beginning to make sure they understand everything from front to back. Then give them a few assignments and have them report back. Finally, once they’re up and running, create a set of metrics that you want to track and let them do their job, using you as a resource if they have any questions.

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December 26th, 2011 by admin

eBook 101: The Writing, Launching and Selling Process

Getting an information eBook off the ground is one of the best ways to start earning online revenue. The process of writing, launching and making money with an eBook involves a lot more than most people realize.

Launching an eBook is much like launching any other product. You first need to do extensive market research to make sure you’re creating a product that people want to buy. Then you need to spend a lot of time creating a good product, so that people who buy it will buy again in the future. Finally, you need to market the product well so that your target audience knows about its existence.

Here’s how to write, launch and sell your informational eBook.

Before You Write a Single Word

Before you write a single word, you need to do your market research.

Doing your market research involves figuring out exactly who your target audience is. Once you know your audience, you then need to figure out what they want.

Your audience should be a very specific group of people. For example, if you’re selling a weight loss product, “women” is far, far too generic. Instead, you might want to go for something like women in their 30’s who are about 40 pounds overweight. You might even want to go more specific than that: Housewives in their 30’s, 40 pounds overweight.

This gives you a very specific market to cater to. It allows you to market to your highest ROI market segment.

Once you know who you’re talking to, the next step is to figure out what they want. There are a few ways to do this.

You can do your research online. Find message boards, chat rooms and website dedicated to your market segment. Look for repeat questions and pain points that seem to come up often.

Also read magazines that cater to your market. What kind of hot buttons do they continually push?

Once you’ve figured out what your market really wants, you can then write an eBook around that topic and know you have a fairly good chance of hitting it out of the park.

Writing the eBook

Creating an eBook is quite a mission. An eBook is typically at least 20,000 words, often a lot more. That means a lot of time in front of the computer.

At times you may question whether or not you’re really committed. At times you might wonder if the eBook will sell, and whether you’re just putting all this effort into something that might just go down the drain.

Staying motivated is a big part of success when it comes to writing an eBook.

Perhaps the best way to write an eBook is to set a daily goal. Instead of trying to write it all at once, just set a goal for yourself. That goal might be 500 words a day, it might be 1,000 words a day. It might be one page a day or three pages a day. Whatever the case may be, just set a daily goal and try to stick to that goal.

At 3 pages a day, in 30 days you’ll have a 90 page eBook. It might not seem like much progress at first, but it very quickly snowballs.

Launching & Selling Your eBook

If you already have an audience, start by launching your book there. Announce your new eBook to your blog, your email list, your Facebook friends and your Twitter followers.

If you don’t already have an email list, the going gets a little bit harder. First, start by seeing if you can find other people who have an audience to promote your book. If you’ve been in the industry for a while, chances are you know some other people who might have some influence.

You can also try paid marketing. Using tools like Google AdWords, Microsoft AdCenter or Facebook Ads can be a powerful way to make an impact.

Finally, try SEO. Create an informative website about your subject and create top notch content about that topic. This method takes more time, but can generate consistent traffic.

Getting an eBook off the ground takes dedication. Once it’s off the ground however, it can generate a lot of revenue for years to come.

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December 16th, 2011 by admin

How to Guest Post to Promote Your Blog

One of the oldest yet most successful ways to promote a blog is through guest posting. Guest Post to promote your blog

Guest posting allows you to get in front of an existing blog’s audience. Unlike just a standard backlink you actually get an entire page to demonstrate that you know your topic.

How do you guest post on someone else’s blog? Let’s take a look.

Finding and Selecting Blogs to Approach

The first step is to find blogs that you’d like to guest post on and approach them about doing the post.

There are two main ways you can do this. First, through getting to know all the relevant blogs in your sphere. Use, Google, Technorati and blogrolls to find relevant blogs and figure out which ones you’d like to appear on.

Alternatively, you can use MyBlogGuest.com’s forums to find blog owners who are actively looking for guest bloggers.

Once you’ve chosen a blog to approach, how do you pitch the blog post?

Making the Pitch

There are two different trains of thought when it comes to pitching posts: Either email the website owner first with a list of potential topics; or just write an entire guest blog and email it to them.

If you’re emailing them a list of potential topics, make sure you include a brief bio and a link to your blog so they can learn more about you. Make it short, or you risk your email not being read.

Make sure each topic suggestion is compelling and targeted specifically towards their audience.

If you’re sending an entire written article already, just send a brief intro in your email. Your whole email should be no more than two or three short paragraphs long. Let your article speak for itself.

How to Write a Successful Post

There are a few things to keep in mind when it comes to writing posts that other people’s audience will love.

First of all, spend some time on their site and get to know their audience. Know what kinds of topics they like and what writing styles they respond to. Write your guest post so that their audience feels like you’re talking directly to them.

Make sure your blog post answers a burning question in their mind or answers a popular question. If you can take a unique angle to something that’s been discussed in the past, so much the better.

Spend as much time on a guest blog post as you would on a post that goes on your own website.

After The Post Goes Live

A lot of the work in guest posting actually comes after the post has actually been published.

The first thing you want to do is help promote the post. Use Twitter, Facebook and your own email list to promote the post.

Why? Because if the post is successful, you’ll have a very good chance of having another chance to guest blog in the future. Also, if more people see your post, that’s more people who’re going to end up learning about you and seeing your content in action.

Also, having many successful blog posts on different sites will help build your reputation among the blogerati, further increasing your chances of getting more guest blogging gigs in the future.

Another thing you should do after the post is live is check the comments section religiously.

Remember: The people who read and post in the comment section are the site’s most loyal and active readers. If you win these readers over, they’re likely going to turn into active fans of your site as well.

Make sure to respond to every single comment that was posted in response to your article.

 

That’s the long and short of how to succeed in using guest blogging to promote your blog. Guest blogging can be an incredibly powerful way to get in front of audiences of people who may end up loving your content. It’s not the easiest link building method on the planet, but it’s very, very effective.

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December 6th, 2011 by zeeshan

SMO vs. Engagement: Why They’re Different and How You Can Rock Both

When it comes to social media, there are two factors that drive success: Social Media Optimization (SMO) and engagement. Often time’s these two are confused with one another. Though they’re related, they actually address completely different fields within the social media sphere.

So what is SMO, what is engagement and how are they different?

What is Social Media Optimization?

Social media optimization is the more quantitative side of the social media equation. It’s what allows marketers to tackle social media in a systematic and scientific manner.

Let’s say you’re trying to get a certain fan page to go viral. One way you can measure this in SMO terms is through what percentage of people repost your posts.

So if you post something on your wall and it’s “shared” by 1.5% of your fans, that gives you a benchmark metric to measure against. If you track this number whenever you post status updates, you can very quickly start to get a sense for what kinds of things get passed along and what kinds of things don’t.

This is just one example of SMO in action. SMO can track visitors to a page, the number of shares, number of likes, peak traffic times, best days to post and a whole slew of other statistics that you can use to optimize your campaign.

In other words, SMO is the systematic and scientific approach to getting more people to like your page, more shares and overall a more powerful brand effect.

What is Engagement?

Engagement on the other hand is a completely different ballgame. Engagement is the qualitative side of the social media equation.

It’s how engaged your fans are with your work. It’s how emotionally vested they are in your brand. It’s how excited they get about your product when they tell their friends about it. It’s how much they think you care about them.

Fostering engagement doesn’t come from statistics and calculations. Instead, it comes from regularly connecting with your audience in an engaging dialogue.

If you want to foster more engagement, make it a regular goal of yours to foster more activity from your users.

Ask them questions. Get them talking to you and to one another. Host contests that get them involved. Create games for your users. Ask for their feedback.

Pull them into your brand experience. Your users should feel like they’re part of your community.

Two Sides of the Same Coin

It’s important to realize that if you want to succeed on social media, you need to use both optimization and engagement.

If you only have optimization, you’ll have a very technically well run campaign, but it just won’t have that “buzz.” That “buzz” is what causes social media campaigns to take off like wildfire. It’s what gets people to stick around. It’s what people remember.

On the other hand, if you only have engagement, you’re probably not getting as many people to your pages as you could. If you’re not posting your updates at optimal times, if you’re not tracking what kinds of content your visitors like, if you’re not using systematic testing to determine what really works, you’re probably going to have a hard time succeeding in the long run.

In order for you to have a vibrant social media campaign that engages a lot of people, you need to have both optimization and engagement.

Start out in the area where you’re weakest. If you already have an engaged community but haven’t been tracking your metrics, work on your metrics first. On the other hand, if you already have a scientifically well optimized campaign but your user base lacks passion, start out by increasing engagement.

 

That’s the long and short of what SMO is and what engagement is. In the long run, you want to master both to get your campaigns to really take off. Your campaigns must make scientific sense, but they also need to capture the heart of your fans.

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December 1st, 2011 by zeeshan